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Port Richmond, March 4, 2015
Tioga Marine Terminal Sees Very Busy Week


Philadelphia, February 25, 2015

PRPA Announces Availability of State-Sponsored Intermodal Incentive Program to Encourage Container Activity at the Port of Philadelphia


Philadelphia, January 29, 2015
Port of Philadelphia Reports Stunning 16 Percent Jump in Cargo in 2014, Marking Fifth Consecutive Year of Double-Digit Cargo Growth Along City's Delaware River Waterfront


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



PORT'S TIOGA TERMINAL SEES VERY BUSY WEEK

Port of Philadelphia: Week Beginning March 1st

 

PORT RICHMOND, MARCH 4, 2015 --  The marine terminals of the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority are no stranger to bustling activity, as vessels from around the world are regular fixtures on the Delaware River waterfront, but Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA) officials were particularly gratified by the level of activity at its Tioga Marine Terminal during the week beginning on Monday, March 2.

Delaware River Stevedores, Inc. (DRS), the operators of Tioga Terminal, report that during the course of the week, several vessels will be offloading cargo at the facility, with three vessels handling cargo at one time by mid-week.

Cargoes arriving will include project cargo on the Rickmers Tokyo; wood pulp cargoes from the Brazilian company, Fibria, arriving on the M/V Brassiana; and steel plates and project cargo arriving on the BBC Hudson. Rickmers Line has provided regular services at the Tioga Marine Terminal for the past several years, and Fibria Celulose has been delivering its wood pulp cargoes to Tioga since last summer. Other vessel activity is also scheduled during the course of the week.

“We enjoy seeing this level of activity, and are well equipped to handle it,” said DRS’s terminal manager Pat Kryszczak, one of the regular “troops on the ground” at Tioga. “With our new wood pulp account, days with multiple vessels are a more regular occurrence.”

 



 

PHILADELPHIA REGIONAL PORT AUTHORITY ANNOUNCES
AVAILABILITY OF STATE-SPONSORED INTERMODAL INCENTIVE PROGRAM
TO ENCOURAGE CONTAINER ACTIVITY AT THE PORT OF PHILADELPHIA

PORT ALSO REPORTS BIG GAINS IN INITIAL 2015 CARGO ACTIVITY

 

PHILADELPHIA, FEBRUARY 24, 2015--  The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA) is pleased to announce that the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) is now inviting shipping lines to participate in its new Intermodal Cargo Growth Incentive Program, which aims to increase cargo activity at the Port of Philadelphia.  The program will offer a per-container financial incentive to current ocean carriers utilizing the Port.  The program, recently announced by Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf, is effective immediately.

The program offers a $25 per-container financial incentive to current ocean carriers utilizing the Port of Philadelphia, for any new containers moved beyond a carrier’s previously-reported container levels.  It is hoped that carriers will be encouraged to try the Port of Philadelphia as a result of the incentive.  The program was established through PennDOT’s Multimodal Transportation Fund, following consultation between PennDOT, PRPA officials, and other Philadelphia-area maritime businesses.  Similar intermodal incentive programs have been effective in the past at the Port of Philadelphia, and PRPA is pleased about its new funding relationship with PennDOT.

“This new intermodal incentive program is an effective tool to grow our container business, and a fair one, as it rewards both our current customers as well as new carriers who have been considering using the Port of Philadelphia,” said PRPA Executive Director James T. McDermott, Jr.  “It’s a solid investment on the part of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, as increased container business brings so many economic benefits to our region.”

By encouraging companies to move more cargo through the Port of Philadelphia, PennDOT expects that this new program will attract at least 200,000 new annual container moves to the Port over the course of five years.

In his own announcement about the program, Governor Wolf said: “Pennsylvania has a robust transportation system and our ports are a vital part of the movement of goods.  The Port of Philadelphia is an important asset for the Commonwealth’s entire economy.  These incentives will help increase activity at the Port, which will drive commerce across Pennsylvania and could create more than 1,400 good-paying jobs.”

It is widely known that ocean carriers control discretionary cargo, report PRPA officials.  These cargoes, destined from or to places like Chicago, are a target of this program.  More steamship line services also create more export opportunities for Pennsylvania manufacturers.

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) Multimodal Transportation Fund, established by Commonwealth Act 89, includes dedicated budget categories for aviation, rail freight, ports, and other transportation-related projects.

Rules and further details on the program are available from PRPA’s Marketing Department and from PennDOT at www.dot.state.pa.us.

The PRPA Marketing Department can be contacted at (215) 426-2600 or via e-mail at marketing@philaport.com.



PRPA has high hopes that PennDOT’s cargo incentive program will deliver big results at the Port of Philadelphia, especially in light of the fact that initial cargo figures for 2015, as well as statistics for the prior year, demonstrate that cargo growth is already healthy at the Port.  Final cargo statistics for 2014 revealed a 16 percent increase in cargo and the fifth consecutive year of double-digit cargo growth at the Port compared to 2013, and the following figures, comparing January 2015’s cargo performance to January 2014’s performance, indicate that the trend of growth is continuing.

With 481,251 metric tons of cargo handled at PRPA facilities in January 2015, compared to the 418,434 tons of cargo handled in January 2014, there was a notable 15.01 percent increase in tonnage between the two periods.  This was due to increases in all cargo sectors, especially in liquid bulk, ro/ro, and containerized cargoes.

132,919 tons of liquid bulk cargoes moved through the Port of Philadelphia in January 2015 compared to the 94,759 tons handled in January 2014, a 40.27 percent increase.

On the ro/ro front, 20,349 metric tons of automobiles (13,937 individual units) moved through the Port in January 2015 compared to the 18,768 tons (13,224 individual units) that moved the Port in January 2014, an 8.42 percent tonnage increase.

When counted as individual units- 32,270 TEUs handled in January 2015 versus the 31,918 TEUs handled in January 2014- container counts were up 1.10 percent.  When counted as tonnage, however, containerized cargo was up a more dramatic 11.27 percent, with 220,300 metric tons of containerized cargo handled in January 2015 compared to the 197,978 tons handled during the same period last year.

In the breakbulk sector, with 107,683 tons metric tons handled in January 2015 compared to the 106,929 tons handled during the same period last year, breakbulk cargoes overall held steady when comparing the two periods, experiencing about a 1 percent increase.  Several individual breakbulk cargoes, however, showed strong growth when comparing January 2015 with January 2014. 

Strong performers among the Port’s breakbulk cargoes included forest products, which were up 17.33 percent (35,622 tons handled in January 2015 versus the 30,360 tons handled in January 2014) and project cargoes, up 110.37 percent (3,389 tons handled in January 2015 versus the 1,611 tons handled in January 2014).  Cocoa beans also increased dramatically, with 21,873 tons arriving at the Port of Philadelphia in January 2015 compared to the 3,928 tons arriving in January 2014.

“We’re very proud of the 15 percent increase in cargo we experienced at the start of this year compared to the start of last year,” said Mr. McDermott. “While it is still very early in the year, these initial cargo figures demonstrate that a very productive 2015 is on the horizon at the Port of Philadelphia. Our agency works every day with our terminal operators, with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and with all sectors of the maritime community to make this the most efficient, productive port it can be, and these initial numbers show we’re on the right track.”

The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority is an independent agency of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania charged with the management, maintenance, marketing, and promotion of publicly-owned port facilities along the Delaware River in Philadelphia, as well as strategic planning throughout the port district.  PRPA works with its terminal operators to modernize, expand, and improve its facilities, and to market those facilities to prospective port users.  Port cargoes and the activities they generate are responsible for thousands of direct and indirect jobs in the Philadelphia area and throughout Pennsylvania.

 

 

PORT OF PHILADELPHIA REPORTS STUNNING 16 PERCENT JUMP IN CARGO IN 2014,
MARKING FIFTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR OF DOUBLE-DIGIT CARGO GROWTH
ALONG CITY’S DELAWARE RIVER WATERFRONT

 

PHILADELPHIA, JANUARY 29, 2015—Final cargo figures for 2014, compiled by the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA), reveal that 5,950,319 metric tons of cargo were handed at the Port of Philadelphia’s maritime facilities in 2014, a stunning 16.66 percent increase compared to the 5,100,385 tons of cargo handled in 2013.  Further, 2014’s total cargo tonnage marked the fifth consecutive year of double-digit cargo growth at the Port of Philadelphia.

“In the wake of the national economic downturn of a few years ago, we became more aggressive than ever in improving and marketing the Port,” said PRPA Chairman Charles G. Kopp.  “As a result, we’re now experiencing our fifth consecutive year of major cargo increases at our facilities.”

In addition to dramatic tonnage increases, 2014 also marked a particularly large increase in container counts at the Port, with 449,122 TEU’s moving through the Port of Philadelphia in 2014, compared to the already healthy 367,499 TEU’s handled in 2013.  This marked a 22.21 percent increase.  Counted as tonnage, 2,916,148 metric tons of containerized cargo moved through the Port in 2014, a 19.36 percent increase over the year before.  All told, containers have shown consistent growth in the past several years at the Port of Philadelphia.  Containers are handled at PRPA’s Packer Avenue Marine Terminal, the Port’s largest and busiest facility.

Breakbulk cargoes (cargoes not shipped in containers, with the exception of vehicles and liquid bulk) experienced a healthy gain of 14.44 percent in 2014 when compared to 2013.  In all, 1,382,861 metric tons of breakbulk cargoes were handled in 2014, compared to 2013’s 1,208,350 tons.  Highlights include steel, which was up 49.53 percent, with 394,717 tons handled; and forest products, which were up 28.2 percent, with 614,843 tons handled. 

Though down slightly in breakbulk numbers, it’s important to note that  fruit (225,294 breakbulk tons handled) and cocoa beans (97,688 tons via breakbulk) are increasingly being handled as containerized cargoes, meaning that these cargoes aren’t genuinely down at all, only that a portion of them are shifting to containers. 

Automobiles, which began arriving in 2010 and were a big factor in the resumption of the Port’s prosperity after the national economic downturn, continued to show strong performance in 2014.  Counted as individual units, 150,637 automobiles (principally new Hyundai and Kia vehicles) moved through the Port of Philadelphia in 2014, compared to the 129,239 automobiles handled at the Port in 2013, a 16.56 percent increase.  Counted as tonnage, 213,646 tons of vehicles were handled in 2014, an 18.12 percent spike.  Automobiles arrive at the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal and are processed at the adjacent Philadelphia Automobile Processing Facility.

Liquid bulk cargoes continued to show steady growth as well in 2014, with 1,437,664 tons of liquid bulk products moving through the Port last year compared to the 1,267,915 tons handled in 2013, a 13.39 percent increase.  These cargoes are handled via a tank farm located adjacent from the Tioga Marine Terminal, where liquid bulk vessels arrive.

The five consecutive years of double-digit cargo growth at the Port of Philadelphia is detailed as follows: 3,628,312 metric tons handled in 2010, a 14 percent increase over the previous year; 4,001,759 tons handled in 2011, a 10 percent increase; 4,431,214 tons handled in 2012, an 11 percent increase; 5,100,385 tons handled in 2013, a 15 percent increase; and 5,970,480 tons handled in 2014, a more than 16 percent increase.

The cargo increases of 2014 and recent years are occurring amid an unprecedented period of expansion and investment.  As of right now, a $350 million project to deepen the Delaware River’s main channel from 40 to 45 feet is close to 70 percent complete, with the latest rounds of bids to deepen the remaining  areas or “reaches” of the river now being evaluated for an anticipated spring 2015 resumption of the project.  The deepening project, funded by the federal government with local matching funds provided by PRPA (an agency of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania) is on track for completion in 2017, about the time a deeper and wider Panama Canal will begin serving the world’s ocean carriers.

Further, the PRPA Board of Directors is now evaluating 16 private-sector respondents for its Southport Project, the first major expansion of the Port of Philadelphia in several generations.  The three major parcels encompassing Southport are being offered by PRPA for a variety of potential maritime and energy uses, and the healthy level of responses to the Port’s October 2014 request for expressions of interest bodes well for this ambitious project to boost in a major way the level of economic activity at the Port of Philadelphia.

Additional information about the Port’s cargoes, as well as updates on the deepening project and Southport, can be found at PRPA’s website, www.philaport.com.

The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority is an independent agency of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania charged with the management, maintenance, marketing, and promotion of publicly owned port facilities along the Delaware River in Philadelphia, as well as strategic planning in the port district.  PRPA works with its terminal operators to modernize, expand, and improve its facilities, and to market those facilities to prospective port users.  Port cargoes and the activities they generate are responsible for thousands of direct and indirect jobs in the Philadelphia area and throughout Pennsylvania, as well as numerous other economic benefits.

Attached photograph: Wood pulp cargoes, manufactured by Fibria Celulose of Brazil, being handled at the Port of Philadelphia’s Tioga Marine Terminal.  A cargo that began arriving at the Port in 2014, Fibria’s wood pulp cargoes- used in the manufacture of paper towels, facial tissues, and other household paper products- are a big reason that the Port’s forest products cargoes jumped 28 percent in 2014.

 

 

 

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